Is coffee good or bad?

It can have a place, in moderation, but can also lead to excess

Oh boy. Nothing like tackling a BIG question full of opinion and controversy! Let me see if I can make sense of it all.

Let me start by saying that I stopped having all forms of caffeine as of last week (it has been five days now).

Before I answer why I would do that, let me start by addressing why I started in the first place. As you may have heard, I crashed on my bike in a race in 2015 and my neurologist suggested that coffee would help me focus and concentrate and remember things as my brain healed from the injuries sustained.

He was right. I was never a coffee drinker and think black coffee is quite simply awful, so I drank mochas. It started with one medium mocha (half hot chocolate, half coffee) on weekdays while at work, and then soon it was large, then extra large, then two a day every single day.

At 330 calories each, it was not long before my two years of surgeries and inactivity led me to gain 37 lbs.

Coffee was what I thought about when I woke up and what I did to start the day. I added powdered coffee to my protein shakes and when I started to get back in shape again after my last surgery in 2017, I started drinking coffee with yummy protein powder in it to replace all the bad calories of the mochas I had grown to love.

Fast forward to now, and the observation from my nutrition coach (Dr. Trevor Kashey, PhD) that perhaps it was time to surrender the bean and go without.

So is coffee good or bad?

Well, if you have ever read my stuff or listened to my talks on nutrition you already know that I firmly believe that nothing is ‘good’ or ‘bad’, it is merely appropriate, or inappropriate for your goals.

It is either helping you get better or feel better, and those may be in opposite directions. Like I said, that is not good or bad, just a decision that moves you ahead or holds you back.

So with that said, coffee is a drink (usually hot) made from the roasted and ground beans of a tropical shrub.

Coffee was discovered in Ethiopia and the tribal healers said it had magical healing properties when boiled in water. It quickly spread around the world and as early as the 1500s, coffee houses began to open.

Coffee is high in anti-oxidants as well as B vitamins and some minerals such as potassium, magnesium and a few others. In fact, the polyphenols and hydrocinnamic acids in coffee combined with how much we drink of it, makes it the best anti-oxidant blend in the world, giving us more than fruits and vegetables combined for the average person.

Anti-oxidants help prevent diseases, including some of the big ones like cancer and Type 2 diabetes. So that’s good.

Coffee has caffeine in it, which is a stimulant.

In particular it blocks the function of adenosine, a neurotransmitter in the brain. This blocking increases brain activity and releases norepinephrine (adrenalin) and dopamine which reduces tiredness and makes you feel more alert (and happy I would add).

It has also been shown to improve reaction time and understanding things (cognition) as well as increasing athletic performance by 11-12%.

Wasn’t there a part where I have to show that coffee is ‘bad’?

Well, yes, it is addictive and the more you drink, the less effective it becomes, leading you to drink more.

It can cause anxiety and disrupt sleep and the ability to rest. If you have heart issues, it can make those worse by causing your heart to beat faster. Too much coffee can cause digestive issues like ulcers or loose stool. People who drink lots of coffee and train really hard are much more likely to be at risk for rhabdomyolysis, a potentially deadly condition that can cause kidney failure.

I find this ironic because ‘pre-workout’ drinks are very popular and many contain really high amounts of caffeine – above 250mg, which puts you at risk. (Some people can tolerate more).

Blood pressure is affected as well as increased heart rate, as I said. People used to think coffee was a diuretic (made you have to pee and therefore dehydrate you) but that isn’t actually true, it simply stimulates the bladder, (which obviously has a similar effect).

Coffee can lead to exhaustion – which is why I quit.

Coffee will cause your endocrine system to block or release hormones that give you more energy, and that will be great for 90 to 120 minutes, and then you will suddenly have less energy as the caffeine leaves your system.

Of course this is when many of us go for another ‘hit’, and on it goes. This can actually be masking the fact that you are genuinely exhausted to the core and that can become adrenal fatigue which takes months to recover from (caffeine-free).

Withdrawal can lead to headaches, exhaustion, irritability, and ‘brain fog’ and your body and brain getting used to not being ‘kick started’.

I am happy to report that personally, I have managed to avoid any serious issues so far and mostly feel a more level, steady energy.

So at the end of all of this, is coffee good or bad?

I think it is both. I think that it can have a place, in moderation, but that can also lead to excess.

I think like anything, it can be used responsibly, but as my coach said, it can also promote being stupid and staying up way too late to get a deadline done at the last possible second BECAUSE you have caffeine.

Or complaining that you cannot get anything done or not get through a Monday (or a work day) without it. It’s tempting to use it as a way to work and train way harder than you should be, never stopping, never resting.

Yup, that sounds like me – so I quit. Cold turkey. I am sleeping better already and feel a more ‘steady’ energy all day. I also made it through all of my usual Sunday night paperwork, writing and planning work without it.

Scott McDermott is a personal trainer and the owner of Best Body Fitness in Sylvan Lake.

Just Posted

The Sadies slide into the City on Nov. 6th

Popular band gearing up for a show at The Hideout

Recreational pot is now officially legal

Here are some things you need to know and how legal recreational pot will affect you in Red Deer

Puff, puff, pass: Cannabis is officially legal across Canada

Alberta readies itself for cannabis sales with 17 stores (for now) and a new provincial website

WATCH: Canadian Finals Rodeo only two weeks away

Mayor calls CFR an opportunity to showcase Red Deer

Mellow opening to B.C.’s only legal pot shop

About five people lined up early for the opening of the BC Cannabis Store in Kamloops.

Test case challenges a politician’s right to block people from Twitter account

3 people say Watson infringed their constitutional right to freedom of expression by blocking them

After 50 years, ‘Sesame Street’ Big Bird puppeteer retiring

The puppeteer who has played Big Bird on “Sesame Street” is retiring after nearly 50 years on the show.

Britain, EU decide to take some time in getting Brexit right

Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said “we need much time, much more time and we continue to work in the next weeks.”

Parole denied for convicted killer-rapist Paul Bernardo after 25 years in prison

Paul Bernardo plead for release on Wednesday by arguing he has done what he could to improve himself during his 25 years in prison.

B.C. Lions look to cement CFL playoff spot with victory over Eskimos

B.C. can cement a post-season berth in the wild West Division on Friday night with a home win over the Edmonton Eskimos

Canada ban on asbestos takes effect but mining residues are exempt

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna plans to announce the new regulations implementing the ban on Thursday in Ottawa

Harry and Meghan bring rain to drought-stricken Outback town

Prince Harry and his wife Meghan are on day two of their 16-day tour of Australia and the South Pacific.

Demand for legalized cannabis in early hours draws lineups, heavy web traffic

Government-run and privately operated sales portals went live at 12:01 a.m. local time across Canada, eliciting a wave of demand.

Most Read