Preventing the dangers of burnout in caregivers

Here’s a possible Trivial Pursuit question, ‘What’s the fastest growing unpaid profession in North America?’ I admit I wouldn’t have known the answer. But, according to the Family Caregiver Alliance, more than 65.7 million Americans, that’s 29% of the population, provide care to a family member, loved one or friend who is ill disabled or aged. But when does such labour of love trigger burnout anger in the caregiver?

A report from Johns Hopkins University states, “The average unpaid, or informal, caregiver is a 46 year old female with a full or part-time job who spends about 20 hours a week catering for her mother.”

But for those caring for a loved one older than 65 the average age is 63. Unfortunately, one-third of these caregivers are also in poor health.

Another study carried out in Sweden revealed the shocking news that 18% of people older than 75 were involved in the care of others! For these elderly caregivers this isn’t what they expected to be doing in their golden years. I’m sure while they’re carrying out these arduous daily tasks they must share the thought of the German philosopher Nietzsche who remarked, “There is no greater misery than to remember happier times.”

The problem with an aging population is that they suffer from a variety of problems. For instance, a Gallup survey revealed that 15 million North Americans are caring for someone incapacitated by some form of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of others are helping family members suffering from cancer, stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease or incapacitated by severe unrelenting arthritic pain.

Sooner or later the demands of time and energy made on some caregivers triggers a reaction, similar to the last straw that finally breaks the camel’s back. This crisis occurs when they have neglected their own health for too long.

Caring for others is also a dangerous job. For example, in one study caregivers, age 66 and over, had a 63% higher mortality rate than non- caregivers of the same age.

The physical task facing caregivers can be overwhelming. But according to experts it’s the mental toll that is more likely to bring caregivers to their knees. They suffer from loneliness, anxiety, fear of the future, depression and at times anger at the person they’re caring for. It’s small wonder that they require more anti-depressants and anti-anxiety drugs than the general population.

So how can caregivers cope with physical and mental stress day after day? First, it’s vital that they don’t put their own health at the bottom of the list. This is a sure formula for Burnout 101. Family members must keep a wary eye on the caregiver and realize there’s a crisis in the making if they notice them reaching for alcohol, having difficulty

concentrating, suffering from insomnia or having thoughts of suicide. This is a time when other family members must share the burden.

Caregivers who remain silent and uncomplaining are quicker to suffer burnout. It’s important for them to ‘let it out’ with a family member, friend, clergy or a counselor. It’s also prudent for them to get some form of exercise daily. And to find time during the day for something they enjoy, whether it be reading a book or watching a movie.

Caregivers must be ready for emergencies.

This means trying to plan ahead for the dangers that could occur in the community. For example, you may live in an area that is prone to sudden snow storms. What will

happen at subzero temperatures if electrical power shuts down for days?

Others who reside in tornado regions need to plan an escape route and how to handle someone in a wheelchair. Moreover, even with a plan of action, you won’t get far if the car hasn’t an ample supply of gas.

Care giving involves so much work and stress it’s no wonder the handler suffers Burnout 101. The bad news is this problem is going to get worse with an aging population.

So far I’ve been lucky that I or family members have not had to face this added stress, another factor that may have added to my longevity!

See the web site at www.docgiff.com. For comments, email info@docgiff.com.

Just Posted

Red Deer Mayor Tara Veer discusses thoughts on federal budget

New federal infrastructure funding likely coming to Red Deer

Alberta Election called for April 16th

Upcoming election will be about who is fit to be Premier, says Notley

Red Deer athletes qualify for Pan Am Games in Lima, Peru

The official Pan American Games will be held from July 26th to Aug. 11th

Local youngsters lend a helping hand to the Red Deer Hospital

First Steps and Beyond School students donate to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Five highlights in the 2019 federal budget

Latest budget includes a sprinkling of money for voters across a wide spectrum

Politicians hitting the road for votes in Alberta election campaign

NDP Leader Rachel Notley and United Conservative Leader Jason Kenney have officially launched campaigns

Calgary woman convicted in son’s strep death seeking full parole

The trial heard that Ryan was dead well before his mother called 911 to say he had stopped breathing

Starbucks to test recyclable cups, redesign stores in B.C., U.S. cities

The company also said it plans to redesign its stores as it adapts to increasing mobile pick-up and delivery orders

In pre-election budget, Liberals boost infrastructure cash to cities, broadband

The budget document says the Liberals have approved more than 33,000 projects, worth about $19.9 billion in federal financing

2019 BUDGET: As deficit grows, feds spend on job retraining, home incentives

Stronger economy last year delivered unexpected revenue bump of an extra $27.8 billion over six years

Newfoundland man caught after posting photo of himself drinking and driving

The 19-year-old took a photo of himself holding a beer bottle and cigarette while at the wheel

Here are five political leaders campaigning in Alberta’s spring election

Rachel Notley, Jason Kenney, Stephen Mandel, David Khan, and Derek Fildebrandt

UPDATE Leduc RCMP say sexual assault claim was false

UPDATE Leduc RCMP say investigation revealed sexual assault never took place

Most Read