Meaning of generosity

In light of the recent flooding that have ravaged so many Alberta communities, it’s amazing to see, as has been already pointed out, how people band together in times like these.

We’ve heard many stories of how friends, neighbours and complete strangers have lent helping hands to others as the massive clean-up efforts move forward, and it’s encouraging to see that ‘community spirit’ shine through.

Then there are people who take the concepts of sharing and generosity to new heights.

It was recently reported in the Calgary Herald that children in the Place of Rescue Orphanage in Cambodia, who each received about $12 Canadian during a recent visit from their prime minister’s wife. The children then handed over half of their money to the Paul Brandt Build It Forward Foundation, “specifying that they wanted the money to go to the victims of the Alberta floods.”

Ultimately, the amount rose to $900 which included donations from orphanage staff.

As was pointed out in the story, it’s such an amazing stories of generosity. Such poor children giving to one of the wealthiest urban centres in the world. The story goes onto say that these children, in spite of their circumstances, consider themselves fortunate relative to many in their communities who are forced to live on the streets.

It’s a wonderful story that shows it’s indeed more blessed to give then to receive. The joy found in giving is something these young children have found already. And it’s something many closer to home are finding out in deeper ways these days as well.

Volunteers have generously given of their time to help, and that urge to help out has spread to the corporate sector as well. The point isn’t in how much can be given, but rather that a person takes the initiative to give at all – whether it be financial or in the gift of time.

It may sound like a bit of a cliché, but there is no question that when people join forces in time of adversity and loss like this, communities to emerge stronger and more tightly-knit.

It’s also important to not forget about the affected towns and cities in the weeks and months following the flooding – clean-up efforts could stretch into weeks and months and there are plenty of front-line organizations that could use our support. Organizations like the Canadian Red Cross and the Salvation Army among many others have people right on the ground doing what they always do – helping out.

Let’s continue to remember that although the flood stories may fade in the media in the coming weeks, the rebuilding continues. As does need for support to keep it moving forward.

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