Let’s talk honestly about mental health

Bell Canada urges an open and new conversation about Canada’s mental health

Although society in general is improving when it comes to tackling the issues of mental health, there remains an obvious reluctance within many to honestly discuss the subject.

That’s where Bell Let’s Talk comes in – an initiative that urges an open and new conversation about Canada’s mental health.

Bell Let’s Talk Day is Jan. 31st, and on Bell Let’s Talk Day, Bell will donate more towards mental health initiatives in Canada, by contributing 5¢ for every applicable text, call, tweet, social media video view and use of their Facebook frame or Snapchat filter.

According to their web site, it was back in September 2010 that Bell Let’s Talk began a conversation about Canada’s mental health.

“At that time, most people were not talking about mental illness. But the numbers spoke volumes about the urgent need for action. Millions of Canadians, including leading personalities engaged in an open discussion about mental illness, offering new ideas and hope for those who struggle, with numbers growing every year.

“As a result, institutions and organizations large and small in every region received new funding for access, care and research, from Bell Let’s Talk and from governments and corporations that have joined the cause.

Bell’s total donation to mental health programs now stands at $86,504,429.05 and they are well on our way to donating at least $100 million through 2020.

It’s an excellent initiative as any sense of stigma surrounding mental health discussions simply has to end. Too many people are suffering in silence, and could be helped tremendously if they could start facing the issue through honest, frank discussion.

That’s the first step to wholeness and well-being. From there, there are all kinds of community helps and supports that are available to help, including the Canadian Mental Health Association and the Primary Care Network, which offers counselling and programs to help folks deal with anxiety, for example.

Dedicated to moving mental health forward in Canada, Bell Let’s Talk promotes awareness and action with a strategy built on four key pillars: fighting the stigma, improving access to care, supporting world-class research, and leading by example in workplace mental health.

“One of the biggest hurdles for anyone suffering from mental illness is overcoming the stigma attached to it. The annual Bell Let’s Talk awareness campaign and Day is driving the national conversation to help reduce this stigma and promote awareness and understanding, and talking is an important first step towards lasting change.”

Ultimately, there really is something that every single one of us can do to help.

The Bell web site points out that simple kindness can make a world of difference.

Whether it be a smile, being a good listener or an invitation for coffee and a chat, these simple acts of kindness can help open up the conversation and let someone know you are there for them. That’s certainly a place for all of us to start in helping demolish the stigma, promote awareness and just get those we care about who may be dealing with mental health issue on the road to recovery.

Ask what you can do to help.

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