Exploring effective treatments of UTIs

Have you ever heard of UTI (urinary tract infection) drops?

I doubt it, as these natural herbal drops have just recently been imported from Europe to treat troublesome, acute and chronic E Coli urinary tract infection. UTI Drops have been used successfully in Europe for over 20 years and have now been approved by Health Canada. So why are these natural herbs so effective in combating E Coli, the bacteria that’s responsible for most cases of bladder infection (cystitis)?

Every year 30 to 50 million North Americans, mostly women, the elderly, and those with compromised immune systems, suffer from cystitis. Few ever forget the first attack of severe pain on urination, fever and the constant rushing to the bathroom, or the chronic worry about the next attack. Then, the sheer terror if blood appears in the urine.

Urinary infections can be due to a variety of causes. Some are the result of a fallen bladder due to difficult childbirth which leaves stagnant urine in the bladder. Others result from the ring around the bathtub. Or the shortness of the female urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside) makes it easier for E Coli to enter the bladder. And sexual intercourse is another factor.

So how do you prevent friends from chiding, ‘Ha! We know where you’re going.’ One good prevention is to take showers rather than baths. And to urinate following sex.

Don’t ignore your Mother’s advice. For years, doctors ‘pooh-poohed’ her theory that cranberry juice prevented UTI. But Harvard researchers proved she was right. They discovered that E Coli bacteria have hair-like projections that enable them to stick to the bladder wall, thus allowing them to multiply.

Cranberry juice has an anti-sticking factor that prevents this so E Coli are flushed out during urination.

Dr. Michael Weisspapir, medical director of Eastgate Pharmaceutical, says UTI Drops are more effective than cranberry juice because, in addition to the anti-sticking factor, it has antibacterial and antiseptic properties, and also forms a protective layer on the walls of the urinary tract to prevent further bacterial growth.

Weisspapir explains many remedies have low bioavailability. This means they do not absorb well and a high dose must be used to make them effective. But when the higher dose is required, there’s greater risk of side effects.

Eastgate technology overcomes this problem by a process called ‘self-emulsifying composition’ and ‘Nano technology’. This technique increases solubility and produces a final extract 200 to 1,000 times smaller than the human red blood cell.

This makes UTI Drops highly absorbable so patients receive a low but still effective dose.

UTI drops are also preferable to antibiotics which often kill good bacteria and cause troublesome side-effects such as irritating yeast infections or allergic reactions. Today antibiotics have been so overused to treat recurrent urinary infections that they have become less effective.

The recommended dose of UTI drops is 40 drops diluted in a quarter of a glass of water, mixed well and drunk three times a day.

It does not contain dairy products, wheat, gluten, yeast, corn, sugar or artificial colouring or flavouring. It should not be used if you are pregnant or have severe kidney disease.

There’s an old saying that, “If you don’t go when you gotta go, by the time you go, you’ve already gone!”

UTI drops should end this problem and fewer people will hear the chiding words, “We know where you’re going!”

UTI drops will also ease the frustration of doctors who have patients returning for recurring urinary infections.

The longer I practiced medicine the more I realized that natural remedies were safer than man-made prescription drugs. Every year 100,000 North Americans die from prescription medication. Another 700,000 are admitted to emergency departments for drug complications.

Today, it makes sense that this natural herbal remedy, tested by time should be tried before drugs are prescribed. UTI Drops fills this need. Moreover, this remedy fulfills two important rules in medicine. First, do no harm. Second, keep it simple.

UTI drops at the moment are not available in the U.S.

For medical tips see the web site www.docgiff.com. For comments info@docgiff.com.

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