Donald Trump wins – now what?

As the shock around the world for many begins to dissipate after the news that Donald Trump won the American election last week, we are left to wonder what is next for the U.S., for us as Canadians and even for the world as a whole.

There is no debating that the campaign was close to as dirty as it gets – especially towards the end. For nearly two years leading up to last week’s election, we heard weekly and then daily, rude and distasteful remarks coming from both camps at various times.

The televised debates were becoming increasingly more difficult to watch as jabs became more cruel and important topics became less talked about.

It really all became a game of he-said/she-said or he-done/she-done.

It was a campaign that will undoubtedly go down in the history books, and not in necessarily a good way.

So what’s next?

Well, as President-Elect Trump gets ready to take over the White House in the New Year, he has already began to make announcements in terms of the make-up of his team – the latest of which has proven to be controversial.

Earlier this week, Trump appointed Stephen K. Bannon as his chief strategist and senior counsellor, a position that will give him authority over the strategic direction of the White House. This is a move that is causing waves across the U.S. and beyond. Many are concerned he is too closely linked with the ‘alt-right’ movement, which has been embraced by white nationalists.

Other appointments include a fracking billionaire and venture capitalist who could potentially roll back President Barack Obama’s policies on the environment and energy and allow for heavier production of coal, oil and natural gas.

Trump has also made it no secret that he wishes to have his presidency a family affair. He named his daughter Ivanka as a potential cabinet appointee during the campaign and Donald Trump Jr.’s name has also been mentioned as a possible interior secretary.

However, these ambitions may be stopped by federal law. In the United States a statue passed in the 1960s that states no public official may hire or promote a relative.

In addition, the United States continues to be a country of division. Since Trump’s victory there have been numerous protests across the U.S. involving thousands of Americans. There have even been ‘protest buses’ bringing in protesters to certain populated areas in major cities.

For us here at home, we have heard over the past week how Trump’s win may be better for Albertans than if Clinton had won. This is because he has spoken in favour of the Keystone Pipeline. In fact, many are speculating it will be one of the first things to tackle on Trump’s agenda and it is something that may move to approval quickly. The project is one that Trump highlighted among his top priorities along the campaign trail.

There is no question the U.S. and even the world is divided when it comes to Trump.

He has much to prove and only time will tell what the future holds in that regard. For now, all we can do is sit back and watch.

Just Posted

City council approves operating budget to a tune of $364 million

The 2.02% hike includes 1% for capital investment and 0.11% for the carbon tax

Province not providing aid to Red Deer for its June storm

Cause of storm wasn’t ‘extraordinary’ according to province

UPDATE: Two taken into custody after shots fired in Riverside Meadows

Red Deer RCMP believe incident was targeted attack

WATCH: Alberta Party leadership candidates present visions to Red Deerians

Party members will vote for their new leader on Feb. 7th

City sells former RCMP building, land to province

Construction of new courthouse in Red Deer one step closer to reality

WATCH: Lacombe and Red Deer Chambers prepare members for cannabis legalization

Luncheon speaker educates businesses on marijuana policies

John ‘Chick’ Webster, believed to be oldest living former NHL player, dies

Webster died Thursday at his home in Mattawa, Ont., where he had resided since 1969

Bad timing: Shutdown spoils Trump’s one-year festivities

Trump spends day trying to hash out a deal with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer

Las Vegas shooter acted alone, exact motive still undetermined: Sheriff

Stephen Paddock was behind the gunfire that killed 58 people including two Canadians

Botox, bomb shelters, and the blues: one year into Trump presidency

A look into life in Washington since Trump’s inauguration

Suspected Toronto serial killer targeting gay community arrested

A 66-year-old man is charged with first-degree murder in disappearance of two Toronto men

Barenaked Ladies, Steven Page, to be inducted into Canadian Music Hall of Fame

Canadian band to get top honours at 2018 JUNO Awards

B.C. out of the running for Amazon’s next headquarters

Toronto is the only Canadian city left in the running despite the province backing Metro Vancouver’s bid for new Amazon headquarters

Post interest rate hike debt tips

What to do about your debt and mortgages after the interest rate hike

Most Read