Donald Trump wins – now what?

As the shock around the world for many begins to dissipate after the news that Donald Trump won the American election last week, we are left to wonder what is next for the U.S., for us as Canadians and even for the world as a whole.

There is no debating that the campaign was close to as dirty as it gets – especially towards the end. For nearly two years leading up to last week’s election, we heard weekly and then daily, rude and distasteful remarks coming from both camps at various times.

The televised debates were becoming increasingly more difficult to watch as jabs became more cruel and important topics became less talked about.

It really all became a game of he-said/she-said or he-done/she-done.

It was a campaign that will undoubtedly go down in the history books, and not in necessarily a good way.

So what’s next?

Well, as President-Elect Trump gets ready to take over the White House in the New Year, he has already began to make announcements in terms of the make-up of his team – the latest of which has proven to be controversial.

Earlier this week, Trump appointed Stephen K. Bannon as his chief strategist and senior counsellor, a position that will give him authority over the strategic direction of the White House. This is a move that is causing waves across the U.S. and beyond. Many are concerned he is too closely linked with the ‘alt-right’ movement, which has been embraced by white nationalists.

Other appointments include a fracking billionaire and venture capitalist who could potentially roll back President Barack Obama’s policies on the environment and energy and allow for heavier production of coal, oil and natural gas.

Trump has also made it no secret that he wishes to have his presidency a family affair. He named his daughter Ivanka as a potential cabinet appointee during the campaign and Donald Trump Jr.’s name has also been mentioned as a possible interior secretary.

However, these ambitions may be stopped by federal law. In the United States a statue passed in the 1960s that states no public official may hire or promote a relative.

In addition, the United States continues to be a country of division. Since Trump’s victory there have been numerous protests across the U.S. involving thousands of Americans. There have even been ‘protest buses’ bringing in protesters to certain populated areas in major cities.

For us here at home, we have heard over the past week how Trump’s win may be better for Albertans than if Clinton had won. This is because he has spoken in favour of the Keystone Pipeline. In fact, many are speculating it will be one of the first things to tackle on Trump’s agenda and it is something that may move to approval quickly. The project is one that Trump highlighted among his top priorities along the campaign trail.

There is no question the U.S. and even the world is divided when it comes to Trump.

He has much to prove and only time will tell what the future holds in that regard. For now, all we can do is sit back and watch.

Just Posted

Oh What a Night! celebrates iconic American legends

Frankie Valli and Andy Williams honoured during Red Deer show

Red Deer Lights the Night gets residents into the holiday spirit

Free winter festival is on Saturday, Nov. 17th from 4 to 7 p.m.

Rebels Forward Brandon Hagel signs deal with Chicago Blackhawks

Alexeyev, Anders make Player and Goalie of the Week in October and early November

Dean Brody heads to Red Deer with stripped down, acoustic show

Dirt Road Stories tour offers a kitchen party lodge-type experience

Calgarians vote ‘no’ to bidding for 2026 Winter Games, in plebiscite

Out of 767,734 eligible voters, 304,774 voted and 171,750 said ”no.”

B.C. man wanted in connection to domestic assault in Edmonton

Sterling Miles Booker has ‘ROCK’ and ‘ROLL’ tattooed on his hands

Canada wants free trade deal with southeast Asian nations, Trudeau says

ASEAN nations combined have nearly 650 million people, an economy of US$2.8 trillion, and are already Canada’s sixth-biggest trading partner.

Olympic and Paralympic committees disappointed, but respectful of Calgary’s vote

The majority of voters said ‘no’ to a potential Calgary bid for the 2026 Winter Olympics and Paralympic Games.

Wildfire death toll rises in California as search for missing continues

Authorities reported six more fatalities from the Northern California blaze, bringing the total number of dead so far to 48.

B.C. MLAs urge Trudeau to call byelection immediately in Burnaby-South

Four NDP provincial politicians from British Columbia are urging Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to immediately call a byelection in the federal riding of Burnaby-South.

Prince Charles turns 70 with party, new family photos

Charles is due to have tea on Wednesday with a group of people who are also turning 70 this year

Fear of constitutional crisis escalates in U.S.; Canadians can relate

Some say President Donald Trump is leading the U.S. towards a crisis

Canada stands pat on Saudi arms sales, even after hearing Khashoggi tape

Khashoggi’s death at Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul further strained Riyadh’s already difficult relationship with Ottawa

Most Read