A double-barrelled package to treat hypertension

Today millions of North Americans suffer hypertension and 99% are being treated by prescription drugs.

Studies show that nearly 50% discontinue their medication due to unpleasant side-effects. But tossing away drugs is a hazardous move which can result in earlier death. This week, a double-barrelled natural remedy that helps to prevent high blood pressure. It can also be helpful to those with hypertension who wish to try managing it first without the use of prescription medication.

It’s been said that, ‘societies get the blood pressure they deserve.’

It appears we deserve a lot. It’s estimated that 75 million adult North Americans have hypertension. What is more frightening is that doctors are now seeing this disease in young children who are obese and diabetic.

What causes hypertension?

In some cases doctors cannot pin-point the reason. Sir William Osler, one of the world’s great physicians, said it was good to be born with ‘genetically good rubber’. He was referring to soft, springy arteries less likely to cause hypertension.

But since we cannot choose our parents many people, as they age, develop atherosclerosis (clogged, hardened arteries), the big killer.

Good sense tells us that if water pipes in our homes are clogged, the pressure affects the entire house. Similarly, the constant pounding from increased blood pressure on all our arteries and organs results in a host of problems, coronary attack, stroke, kidney failure, blindness and amputation of legs.

So what can a double-barrelled approach do to prevent this major killer?

Dr. Nathan S. Bryan, at the University of Texas, says that for 100 years researchers have known that nitroglycerine eased angina heart pain by increasing the blood supply to the heart’s muscle.

But it was a mystery how this happened. Then researchers discovered the miracle molecule of nitric oxide (NO). They were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1998.

Early in life we all produce large amounts of NO in the endothelial lining (the innermost lining of blood vessels). This keeps arteries expanded.

But after age 40 the production of NO decreases, arteries constrict causing hypertension. This constant pressure injures the endothelium and triggers a chemical and inflammatory reaction that kills one North American every 37 seconds.

A natural remedy, Neo40, is now available.

It sends a message in nanoseconds to endothelial cells to start producing nitric oxide. Dr. Bryan reports some people take L-arginine to produce NO. But Neo40 is more effective since it contains L–citrulline, Vitamin C, beet root and hawthorne.

The prescribed dose is to slowly dissolve one tablet in the mouth twice a day for two weeks, then one daily. This provides a quick start to lowering blood pressure. But it’s a lifetime treatment as once a deficiency occurs the body will never again produce sufficient NO.

The next part of the double-barrelled attack involves high doses of Vitamin C and lysine.

It’s also a lifetime treatment because, unlike animals, humans, due to a genetic mishap, lost the ability to produce this vitamin eons ago. Vitamin C is needed to produce collagen, the glue that holds cells together and its lack sets the stage for atherosclerosis. The addition of lysine, an amino acid, strengthens arteries, decreasing the risk of rupture and stroke. However, unlike Neo40 that dilates arteries, high doses of C can prevent atherosclerosis, and if already present, begins to unclog all arteries.

The dose is 4,000 – 6,000 mg daily of C and 3,000 – 4,000 mg of lysine daily either in capsule or powder form. Dr. Sydney Bush, the English researcher who made this revolutionary discovery, reports it takes six months before the first signs of arterial reversal can be seen. See the dramatic before and after photos at my web site www.docgiff.com

It’s unfortunate that most doctors do not know about these natural ways to treat hypertension.

Of course there is a place for prescription drugs to treat hypertension. But it’s tragic that these natural, safe and often effective remedies are not tried first. And they are as close as your Health Food Store. And remember prevention of hypertension is as important as treatment.

For comments, email info@docgiff.com.

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