Red Deer College releases five-year strategic plan

  • Sep. 26, 2012 2:57 p.m.

Providing details about plans for the future, Red Deer College released a five-year Strategic Plan recently.

Entitled ‘A Learner-Centred Future’, the plan was first presented to faculty and staff by RDC President and CEO Joel Ward.

“We listened very closely to our community both within RDC and throughout Central Alberta and have responded to the passionate and insightful input from so many who care about the future of the College,” said Ward.

“The RDC of 2017 will continue to serve our learners by offering expanded programming including more degrees. Leadership, excellence and innovation will be the hallmarks of how we operate in delivering relevant programs leading to careers, and personal growth for our learners.”

The five-year plan was developed through a unique collaborative process that brought together key stakeholders across all College departments and divisions to give input, reflecting the diversity and viewpoints of RDC.

Then, starting last December, 20 groups were formed from RDC staff and faculty who sought input from more than 800 Central Albertans about what the strategic direction of RDC should be over the next five years.

“We clearly heard from the community that the Red Deer College of 2017 should be known for engaging students in applied, innovative and real world learning,” said Dr. Gerry Paradis, associate vice president of strategic planning and research at RDC, who helped to facilitate the overall process of developing the plan.

“We’re so grateful for the community’s input and role in setting our vision for the next five years at RDC.”

Faculty say the RDC of 2017 will be a comprehensive post-secondary institution in Central Alberta with an academic reputation that positions the College as one of the top post-secondary institutions in the province offering certificates, diplomas, advanced skills training and degrees.

Ward said that at the centre of all that RDC does is the learner and by focusing even more on students through this new Strategic Plan, RDC is emphasizing their commitment to graduates who, as full partners in their education, will be autonomous, competent and recognized for their capacity to apply their learning to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

“We have always strived to deliver the best education possible and this plan ensures that we remain on that course and will be the post-secondary institution of choice for learners.”

To check out ‘A Learner-Centred Future,’ visit www.rdc.ab.ca/strategicplan.

-Weber

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