Plan to create a national securities regulator is constitutional: Supreme Court

The unanimous ruling could help advance plans for a national regulator of capital markets

The Supreme Court of Canada says the Constitution allows Ottawa and the provinces to set up a national securities regulator.

In addition, the high court finds federal draft legislation for countrywide oversight of stocks, bonds and other investments falls within Parliament’s powers over trade and commerce.

RELATED: Statcan’s plan to harvest private banking info on hold, pending investigation

The unanimous ruling could help advance plans for a national regulator of capital markets, an idea under discussion since at least the 1930s.

British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Ontario, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Yukon and the federal government have signed a memorandum of agreement to create a new model.

The plan includes a common regulator, a council of ministers to play a supervisory role, a model law that provinces and territories could pass, and federal legislation to manage systemic risk, allow for data collection and address criminal matters.

RELATED: Federal Trans Mountain pipeline purchase seen as ‘betrayal’ by many opponents: CSIS

The Quebec Court of Appeal said last year that the overall plan was unconstitutional, prompting Ottawa to head to the Supreme Court.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Archived stories and photos from past years hosted on this website

Red Deer Express closed its doors March 27 - current local news, sports, entertainment and community stories still available through the Red Deer Advocate daily newspaper

B.C. prepared if Alberta shuts off fuel supplies, David Eby says

If B.C. continues pipeline battle, ‘we’ll finish it,’ Alberta’s Jason Kenney vows

Most Read