In this Feb. 7, 2019 photo, the sun sets behind the ice-covered Platte River in Columbus, Neb. Mentioning climate change can kill a conversation. But a new Alberta project is using the topic to start one - and has shown people from geologists to farmers to environmentalists they have more in common than they thought. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Nati Harnik

Alienated: Alberta project seeks to find common language on climate change

Talk about climate change in the energy-rich province can be difficult

Mentioning climate change can kill a conversation. But a new Alberta project is using the topic to start one — and is showing people from geologists to farmers to environmentalists that they have more in common than they thought.

“Climate change has become quite a polarized issue and it often falls down the line of identity,” said Amber Bennett of Climate Outreach, one of the organizers of the Alberta Narratives Project, which released its final report this month.

“Communication has a big role to play because it can help broaden that and talk to people about what they care about rather than asking them to be different than who they are.”

Talk about global warming can raise temperatures anywhere. But in Alberta — where oil drives the economic bus and climate skepticism is strong — opinions may be held more firmly.

“Alberta is a different beast,” said organizer Julia-Maria Becker of the energy think-tank Pembina Institute.

The project — supported by 75 organizations including government, foundations, universities, churches and industry — is attempting to find a way for different people to at least talk, if not agree. Too often, said Becker, people are afraid to even mention climate change.

“People don’t feel comfortable the moment they start talking about this. They get shut down because they feel they are going to offend someone.”

Or they get defensive. Oilpatch workers, Becker said, often take personally suggestions their industry is “dirty.”

To get past that, the project used a method developed in the United Kingdom. It convened 55 meetings across the province with a total of 482 people. Each group had something in common. There were meetings for church-goers, engineers and geologists, school children, farmers, women, business leaders, oilfield workers, immigrants, parents, environmentalists and small-c conservatives.

Group leaders presented participants with five “stories” about Alberta — five- or six-paragraph sketches that presented climate change within contexts from provincial pride to future generations to ethics. Participants discussed which parts they liked and which they didn’t.

The common bond within the group made people more willing to speak.

“People feel like they are with others who they already know and trust,” Bennett said.

Opinions varied widely, said Becker. The point was not to develop policy but to find language that everyone felt comfortable using.

“This is not convincing people about policies. It’s about having conversations about options.”

People loved it, she said. Sessions often ran late.

“It seems like we found something for which there is a hunger.”

READ MORE: Court rejects B.C.’s request to declare Alberta oil export law unconstitutional

One thing the project found was that people are tired of bluster. “Alberta First” rhetoric rolled as many eyes as “Shut the Tarsands.”

“The language comes across as too politic-y, not authentic or genuine,” said Bennett. ”People wanted language that isn’t so carefully worded and sterilized, but language we use in our everyday conversation.

“People wanted a sense of acknowledgment that this is hard and it’s going to be hard.”

Recognition was universal that Alberta owes much to its energy industry, as was a love of the province’s outdoors. People agreed weather is changing and the province needs to prepare. Everyone feared Alberta has too many eggs in one economic basket.

There’s more to life in Alberta than money, people said. And we all need to talk.

The project has already spawned spinoffs to keep the conversation going, including corporate retreats and book clubs.

“We’ve had briefings with more than one political party,” Becker said.

The narratives project isn’t going to have everyone singing around the campfire anytime soon, said Bennett. Nor is that the point.

“There’s no magic bullet. There’s a lot more that needs to happen that is outside the realm of communication.”

But it’s a start.

“It clearly came out that many people feel alienated from the current conversations around climate change. Language can help, and starting from … what matters to people is a good place to start.”

Bob Weber, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Alberta Election called for April 16th

Upcoming election will be about who is fit to be Premier, says Notley

Red Deer athletes qualify for Pan Am Games in Lima, Peru

The official Pan American Games will be held from July 26th to Aug. 11th

Local youngsters lend a helping hand to the Red Deer Hospital

First Steps and Beyond School students donate to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Red Deer RCMP arrest man during break and enter in progress

RCMP found two males in the parking garage attempting to steal a vehicle

Red Deer RCMP announce new Officer in Charge

Grobmeier has 26 years of service with the RCMP where he has moved through the ranks across Canada

Defiant vigil starts healing in New Zealand after massacre

Police say the gunman in the shooting that killed 50 acted alone

2019 BUDGET: As deficit grows, feds spend on job retraining, home incentives

Stronger economy last year delivered unexpected revenue bump of an extra $27.8 billion over six years

UPDATE Leduc RCMP say sexual assault claim was false

UPDATE Leduc RCMP say investigation revealed sexual assault never took place

Fought to unite Alberta conservatives: Former MP Kenney ready to run for premier

Kenney, 50, was born in Oakville, Ont., raised in Saskatchewan, and spent his adult years in Alberta

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley wants chance to ‘finish that job’

Notley, 54, is the daughter of the late Grant Notley, who led the NDP from 1968 to 1984

PHOTOS: Massive fire at Wetaskiwin’s Rigger’s Hotel

Multiple fire departments involved, building badly damaged

Alberta government announces further easing of oil production restrictions

The government said it will continue to monitor the market and its response to the increases

Trudeau condemns hateful, ‘toxic segments’ of society after New Zealand shooting

Prime Minister expressed sorrow at the many attacks in recent years

Air Canada grounds its Boeing Max 8s until at least July 1 to provide certainty

Airlines around the world have been working to redeploy their fleets since their Max 8s were grounded last week

Most Read