This combination photo shows the totally eclipsed moon, center, and others at the different stages during a total lunar eclipse, as seen from Los Angeles, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

2-for-1: Total lunar eclipse comes with supermoon bonus

On Sunday night, the moon, Earth and sun lined up to create the eclipse, which was visible throughout North and South America

The only total lunar eclipse this year and next came with a supermoon bonus.

RELATED: Hundreds enjoy lunar eclipse through UVic telescopes

On Sunday night, the moon, Earth and sun lined up to create the eclipse, which was visible throughout North and South America, where skies were clear. There won’t be another until the year 2021.

It was also the year’s first supermoon, when a full moon appears a little bigger and brighter thanks to its slightly closer position.

The entire eclipse took more than three hours. Totality — when the moon’s completely bathed in Earth’s shadow — lasted an hour. During a total lunar eclipse, the eclipsed, or blood, moon turns red from sunlight scattering off Earth’s atmosphere.

In addition to the Americas, the entire lunar extravaganza could be observed, weather permitting, all the way across the Atlantic to parts of Europe.

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The moon during a total lunar eclipse is seen on the tip of the tongue of the giraffe sculpture outside the Dallas Zoo in Dallas, late Sunday night, Jan. 20, 2019. (Michael Hamtil/The Dallas Morning News via AP)

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