The importance of observing Remembrance Day

There will be two services in Red Deer

On Remembrance Day we’re all united in a common cause to consider what has been given for us – both recently and in the years before many of us were even born. The relevance of the day must never be forgotten. It’s not just not another day off, too much has been lost and too high a price has been paid for anyone to have careless attitudes about such an important day and life event.

This year also marks a special year as it’s the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War.

As we bow our heads and take a moment of silence, it’s important to remember the men and women who served and to know how much they sacrificed for us to be here living in peace.

Remembrance Day is becoming more meaningful over the years with the never-ending conflicts around the globe. With these deaths there is a reminder of how vigilant we must be to guard the gift of peace and stability we enjoy here at home.

As for the poppy, a writer first made the connection between the poppy and battlefield deaths during the Napoleonic wars of the early 19th century, remarking that “Fields that were barren before battle exploded with the blood-red flowers after the fighting ended.”

After John McCrae’s poem In Flanders Fields was published in 1915 the poppy became a popular symbol for soldiers who died in battle.

When the world is a relatively calm place, Remembrance Day can be a difficult day for the younger set, not to mention many adults, to relate to. Services may be well attended but the realities of war and loss are hard to connect with in times of relative calm. Often young people have little to bridge themselves to the wars of the past, but it’s vital for them to still take part in these ceremonies.

The importance of never forgetting the sacrifices of those who have served in the war is that much more greater. The younger generations need to be informed of those men and women who fought for the freedoms we enjoy today.

We encourage Red Deerians to attend the services this coming Sunday at the Servus Arena (4725 43 Street) at 10:30 a.m. The Korean War Veterans’ Association service is happening outdoors at Veterans’ Park (49th Ave. and Ross St.) at 10:30 a.m. Parking is available at the Sorensen Station Parkade, on surface lots or metered on-street parking.

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