Trash or treasure? Let the British Artiques Roadshow tell you

  • Apr. 17, 2013 2:59 p.m.

BY JENNA SWAN

Red Deer Express

Ever wondered how much your family heirlooms and antiques are worth?

Maureen Wickham and David Freeman, hosts of the British Artiques Roadshow and expert appraisers, will be at Parkland Mall to share their wisdom with Central Albertans on May 4 and 5 from 10 a.m. till 6 p.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. till 5 p.m. on Sunday.

Krista Dunstan, marketing coordinator for Parkland Mall said this will be the second time the mall has hosted the British Artiques Roadshow after having previously stopped in 2009.

“People who are in the mall may stop by and see other Central Albertans antiques or you can make an appointment and bring in your own items.”

In the past, Central Albertans have had a variety of British artwork, heirlooms, and antiques uncovered which have all contributed to the nearly $60 million worth of antiques that have been discovered across Canada by hosts Wickham and Freeman.

The roadshow’s web site states that “The British Artiques Roadshow is looking forward to coming back to Red Deer to unravel more myths and legends, appraise and value your family heirlooms and hopefully help and advise you professionally, pleasingly without bias or prejudice.”

“It’s exciting to have people unearth an old, valuable item and to have people get their items appraised,” said Dunstan. “It really creates that extra value for the customers in the mall.”

The Roadshow will hit Red Deer on their first Alberta stop and then continue on to Grande Prairie.

Any Central Albertans who wish to have an item appraised must make an appointment before April 21. Appointment times may be booked by calling the mall’s Guest Services at 403-343-8997.

Each item appraisal will cost $15, with three items costing $40.

Officials with the British Artiques Roadshow added they will not appraise any of the following items including weapons of any kind, dolls, teddy bears, orientalia, collections such as stamps or coins, baseball or hockey cards, jewellery of any kind, ancient cultural or ethnic artifacts, and no upholstered furniture or textiles of any kind.

In the past, Red Deer has been known for residents having such items appraised as paintings, clocks/watches, musical instruments, books, wood furniture, glassware, and ceramics.

jswan@reddeerexpress.com

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