Put them in prison to find out about blood cholesterol

Benjamin Disraeli, the distinguished British Prime Minister, once ridiculed an opposition member of parliament by saying, “He is distinguished by his ignorance for he only had one idea and that was wrong.”

Today 99% of doctors have one idea that cholesterol-lowering drugs are the be-all-and-end-all to lower blood cholesterol. I believe history will prove them wrong. This week, an old prisoner experiment tells a story, along with a natural remedy to lower blood cholesterol.

Dr. John Judkin, formerly Emeritus Professor of Physiology at London University, London, England, made headlines years ago when he reported that a high dietary intake of animal fat and the eating of foods containing cholesterol were not the cause of coronary heart disease. Of course he was ridiculed for such an idea.

But Judkin pointed to a greater correlation between the intake of sucrose (ordinary sugar) and coronary attack. For instance, a study conducted in 15 countries showed that as the population consumed more sugar, there was a dramatic increase in heart attack.

What is more impressive is a prison study carried out by Milton Winitz, a U.S. biochemist, in 1964. Eighteen prisoners, kept behind bars for six months, were provided food that was well regulated.

In this controlled environment it was proven that when the prisoner diet was high in sugar, blood cholesterol increased and when dietary sugar was decreased there was a huge drop in blood cholesterol. Can you imagine the screaming and hollering from rights groups if researchers tried this experiment today!

History is on Professor Judkin’s side. One hundred years ago coronary heart attack was a rare event. In fact, so rare that Dr. Dudley White, Harvard’s famous cardiologist, remarked that when a case arrived in emergency at the Massachusetts General Hospital, other doctors were alerted so they could witness this disease first-hand.

In the last 100 years there’s been an extraordinary change in North American dietary habits. Now we feed children cereals that are often half sugar. I’ve said facetiously that it would be safer for them to eat the box! We have soft drinks, desserts and prepared foods loaded with sugar. It’s hard to escape what I’ve labeled ‘the white devil.’

But why does excess sugar cause an increase in blood cholesterol? Once ingested, sugar breaks down into equal amounts of glucose and fructose.

Glucose is then used to power the biochemical process that provides energy for daily functions of the body. Fructose, on the other hand, follows a different route, producing acetate that is one of the building blocks needed by the liver to manufacture cholesterol. So the more sugar you eat the greater the production of cholesterol.

But you don’t have to be behind bars to lower blood cholesterol. A natural product, Sytrinol, consists of polymethoxylated flavons derived from the peel of citrus fruits. It also includes tocotrienols, powerful antioxidants, extracted from the fruit of the palm tree.

Dr. Michael T. Murray, one of the world’s authorities on natural medicine, says, “The research on Sytrinol is extremely impressive.” This is because multiple studies show that in many cases Sytrinol lowers blood cholesterol by 30%, LDL the bad cholesterol, by 27% and triglycerides, by 34%.

These changes may occur within one month.

Sytrinol works by decreasing the oxidation of bad cholesterol, a factor in plaque formation that narrows coronary arteries.

Sytrinol also decreases inflammation of arteries, believed to be associated with heart attack. And by lubricating platelets, the small blood particles responsible for blood clot formation, it curbs the chance of one forming in coronary arteries.

The dose of Sytrinol is 300 milligrams once a day. It is well-tolerated with no complications reported even when 50 times the regular dose is prescribed.

It’s available in Health Food Stores. I believe it’s always prudent to try natural remedies first, due to the potential complications of cholesterol-lowering drugs.

The moral? Having one idea that is wrong is dangerous. It’s also wrong to forget that the first rule of medicine is ‘to do no harm.’

See the web site www.docgiff.com. For comments, email info@docgiff.com.

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