Shaye Anderson, Alberta Municipal Affairs minister. File Photo

Alberta Ministers pleased with new pipeline deal

Ministers of Transportation and Municipal Affairs Brian Mason and Shaye Anderson say it’s a good day

May 29 was a good day for Albertans and all Canadians, according to Alberta Minister of Transportation Brian Mason and Minister of Municipal Affairs Shaye Anderson.

The federal government announced on Tuesday the purchase of the Kinder Morgan Pipeline from Alberta to British Columbia. The Government of Alberta will invest about $2 billion into an indemnity pool.

Minister Anderson says the the investment will only be payable once oil is flowing through the pipeline. After that the investment turns into an equity stake in the project.

“This deal will unlock investment in our oil sands. We know that people across this province and in Central Alberta are involved in the oil sands through different industries,” said Anderson, adding the deal will “unlock investment across this province.”

After the announcement, Anderson said people went back to work that day in the oil sands.

“This is going to create certainty which will create more investment in this province, which means more people are going to go back to work,” said Anderson.

Minister of Transportation says there will be plenty of work that will begin immediately as there is a back log of product waiting to be sent out.

“We will see many benefits coming from this pipeline. Immediately we will see more jobs, it will stimulate to oil patch, and reduce the price differential,” Mason said.

The pipeline being built means there will be more money paid to the government for things like roads, schools and hospitals, according to Anderson.

While a start date is not yet known, Ministers Mason and Anderson believe shovel will be put to ground soon.

Minister Mason also commented on the Government of British Columbia continuing their most current court case against the pipeline.

He says the court case isn’t likely to delay progress on the pipeline.

“The Federal government is committed to seeing it through, … we are committed to seeing it through,” said Mason.

So far there have been 16 court cases from the Government of British Columbia against the pipeline, each one was unsuccessful.

Minister Anderson says the people of British Columbia have their right to speak up for their beliefs and to see it in court, but he is confident the pipeline will be built.

“They are allowed to speak up and and defend their beliefs,” Anderson said. “But, we have won 16 out of 16 court cases.”

The pipeline will also have the added benefit of allowing Alberta and Canada to send its product to other markets.

“We won’t be captive to the American market anymore,” said Mason.

Mason and Anderson said the investment by the Federal Government is something they are both “very pleased” with.

Anderson called it a “great move forward” while Mason says it will benefit all of Canada, not just Alberta.

“We have been called on by our opposition to be more aggressive. Instead we used a steady and careful strategy, where we shifted the public’s interest to our side,” said Mason, adding, “we were even able to get the public from B.C. on our side.”

“It is a good day for Alberta and for all of Canada,” said Anderson.

 

Minister of Infrastructure and Transportation Brian Mason. File Photo

Just Posted

The Dragonfly Children’s Healing Centre set to open next month

Expanded programming will broaden scope of The Outreach Centre’s work

Special air quality statement in effect for Central Alberta

Wildfire smoke from B.C. covering 95 per cent of the province

Blackfalds RCMP warn of attempts to steal property

This week two males attempted to steal a utility vehicle from a rural property

Tools for Schools program in need of school supplies for students

Supplies will be donated to students across Central Alberta

Smiles Thru Lindsey Foundation hosting a drive-in movie fundraiser

Excitement building as the big event draws closer

What’s Up Wednesday – August 15th, 2018

Tune in to What’s Up Wednesday, with hosts Carlie Connolly, Todd Vaughan and Mark Weber

Farmers ponder impact of alternatives to pesticides being banned

The nicotine-based pesticides scientists have linked to a rising number of honey bee deaths will be phased out of use in Canada over a three year period starting in 2021.

Time to kick maverick Tory MP Maxime Bernier out of caucus, Scheer urged

Conservative MP Maxime Bernier is taking issue with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s oft-repeated message of diversity in Canada, calling it a form of “radical multiculturalism.”

Thousands of police officers expected at regimental funeral in Fredericton

Two civilians were killed in a shooting in Fredericton that also claimed the lives of two police officers.

Liberals look at creating federal holiday to mark legacy of residential schools

AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde said day to recognize painful legacy would boost understanding

Interim GoFundMe payments approved in Humboldt Broncos crash

$50,000 to be given to each of the 13 survivors and each family of the 16 people who died

Are you Canada’s next Masterchef?

Home cooks looking to follow their cuisine dreams can apply now.

Ponoka RCMP seek arrest warrants in Hammy’s Liquor armed robbery

The armed robbery occurred with a knife on Aug. 11 and one suspect was caught shortly after

Women-owned businesses generate $68,000 less revenue than men’s: survey

When Dionne Laslo-Baker sought a bank loan to expand her burgeoning organic popsicle and freezies business in 2014, she was “shocked” by the feedback she received from one of the bankers.

Most Read