53 million year old scorpionfly fossil found in B.C.

The discovery adds to Canada and Russia’s geographical link after similar fossil found in Pacific-coastal Russia.

(Canadian Press)

It seems Canada and Russia have a prehistoric connection of the “beautiful” kind involving a 53-million-year-old insect fossil called a scorpionfly.

Paleoentomologist Bruce Archibald of Simon Fraser University and the Royal BC Museum says the discovery in British Columbia’s McAbee fossil beds is strikingly similar to fossils of the same age from Pacific-coastal Russia.

A previous connection between the two countries’ Pacific regions has been seen in the same area near Cache Creek, B.C., through fossilized plants and animals.

Archibald says his identification of the new, colourfully winged species of scorpionfly found at the protected heritage site is another example of Canada and Russia’s ancient geographical link, before the continents split apart.

The related Russian scorpionfly was identified in 1974 by a researcher who now works at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow and is Archibald’s co-author on an article published online in The Canadian Entomologist.

The article also features the discovery of another scorpionfly species found by an amateur in fossil collecting near Princeton, B.C.

The Canadian Press

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