Lorne Elliott brings music and comedy to City

You’re not going to find a nicer, more easy-going comedian than Canada’s own Lorne Elliott, who is including Red Deer on his current tour with a show at the Welikoklad Centre on Oct. 24th.

Performance time is 8 p.m.

Elliott has been perfecting his comedic performances for about 40 years, so there is no question he’s a pro. But he’s also a charming, warm and extremely affable man – whether it’s during an interview or in front of hundreds. And those are the qualities that have fueled his popularity across the nation and abroad these many years now.

“A sense of humour is common sense,” he said during a recent chat, pointing out how important it is to laugh – a key to keeping a healthy perspective in life. Enjoying a laugh within an audience is that much more fun. “There’s a place in our culture for that.”

His concert performance is a selection of monologues and songs dealing with life experience, so there’s an immediate universality. “It’s about those little things that happen – the stories that come out of those situations.

“Also, with a stand-up show, you can throw things in and take stuff out on the fly – that’s kind of the excitement of it. But it does take 40 years before you get comfortable with doing that,” he added with a laugh.

And along with his wacky style, it is the timelessness of his material melded with observations of trends that propel his shows to the forefront.

“I started going on stage at a time when hair like mine was fashionable, and I hung a guitar hung around my neck to complete the look. Somewhere around that time people started laughing at me, and I saw no reason why I shouldn’t join them.”

That’s pretty much how it all started, and it’s been a journey of writing, performing, sharing and keeping close tabs on the culture’s pulse that has provided reams of inspiration for his shows ever since. But he’s not restricted to his one-man shows – Elliott is also a prolific playwright as well.

One of his plays, The Night The Racoons Went Berserk, won the Best New Play Award at the Quebec Drama Festival 1983 and it was produced at the Charlottetown Theatre Festival in 1986 along with Culture Shock, another comedy of his which has been produced across Canada since 1981: it was filmed by CBC TV in 1989. It was also produced in Red Deer just a few years ago with tremendous results. Other highlights include Tourist Trap which premiered in August 2000 at Theatre On The Grand in Fergus (Ontario) and it has had several productions across Canada since then, the latest in Newfoundland in 2012.

His play How I Broke Into Showbiz was produced in Charlottetown in 2005 and Culture Shock – The Musical premiered in July 2009 at the Stephenville Theatre festival.

He has also written screenplays and TV comedies, skits and revues. For CBC he did TV Comedy Variety shows, among others What Else is On and Lorne Elliott’s Really Rather Quite Half-Decent TV Special.

But back to his one-man shows – his presentation, much loved by audiences around the world, is delightfully foolish, witty and thought-provoking.

He always injects a bit of local humour into his shows as well, and audiences are appreciative of the effort, he adds. Being in Red Deer just after the federal election will mean altering things just a touch – he’s had a bunch of material ideal pre-election, but will of course offer fresh new views on whatever Canada’s political landscape looks like post Oct. 19th.

Meanwhile, through the course of his career, Elliott has toured and performed in theatres across Canada, the U.S. and Australia.

As indicated earlier, Elliott started his creative journey early on, performing in 1974 as a folk musician on the east coast.

At the same time he kept writing fiction as well as songs, monologues and one-liners. He also tried his hand at radio, with extremely successful results – Madly Off In All Directions was his own CBC Radio Comedy Series taped in concerts across Canada. It was greeted with such enthusiastic audience response that the Series went on for 11 seasons till fall 2006.

Clearly, Elliott is multi-talented. He enjoys applying his raw creativity to a number of genres, adding that each in turn fuels the others. “One thing nourishes the other,” he said. “It’s all about keeping that creative side of you alive.”

Being funny just comes naturally to Elliott. And he gets lots of ideas and inspiration from regular funny folks wherever he runs into them – it hasn’t been necessarily the big shot celebrities that have provided the most influence.

“People who I just run into and have a good time with – and they make me laugh.”

And although he comments on serious situations, the bright side always shines through. Coming up with material used to come in sudden creative jolts. And sure, there may be those nights where he feels a bit tired, or maybe even isn’t feeling well at all. But once he hears that first laugh, something magical tends to happen.

“Where you get the energy from is the audience – people laugh – they feel good and then you feel good. That’s what it’s all about – making a roomful of strangers happier then when they first came in. You really feel honoured.”

For tickets, call 403-755-6626 or 1-800-661-8793 or visit www.blackknightinn.ca.

editor@reddeerexpress.com

Just Posted

UPDATE: Red Deer RCMP arrest man involved in fatal hit and run

RCMP flew to Nipawin, Sask. to arrest Tosh Vertraeten

Pop Evil hits the stage at Bo’s Nov. 25th

Acclaimed band is touring in support of self-titled disc released early this year

Oh What a Night! celebrates iconic American legends

Frankie Valli and Andy Williams honoured during Red Deer show

Red Deer Lights the Night gets residents into the holiday spirit

Free winter festival is on Saturday, Nov. 17th from 4 to 7 p.m.

First Nation marks ‘milestone’ land deal at Alberta ceremony

Lubicon Lake First Nation Chief Billy-Joe Laboucan signed treaty last month

Commercial trucks banned from left lane of Coquihalla

B.C.’s Ministry of Transportation has introduced a new program that hopes to prevent accidents and closures on the Coquihalla Highway.

Canadians more prepared for weather disaster than financial one: poll

RBC recommends people check their bank app as often as the weather app

Supreme Court hears case on migrant detainees’ rights to challenge incarceration

Currently, migrants who do not hold Canadian citizenship can only challenge detention through an immigration tribunal or a judicial review.

Canada Post issues new offer to employees as eBay calls on Ottawa to end strikes

Ebay is calling on the federal government to legislate an end to the Canada Post contract dispute, warning that quick action is needed to ensure retailers don’t lose out on critical Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales.

No G20 member has climate plan strong enough to meet Paris targets: report

Canada’s push to be a world leader in the fight against climate change may be hampered by its distinction for producing the most greenhouse gas emissions per person among the world’s 20 largest economies.

City of Wetaskiwin didn’t apply utility hikes to bills

Clerical financial error discovered by Wetaskiwin city council

Black Panther claw, Power Rangers blade among 2018’s ‘worst toys,’ safety group says

The World Against Toys Causing Harm organized announced its 46th annual list in Boston on Tuesday

What now for Calgary, Canada and Olympic Games after 2026 rejection?

Calgary, along with the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver and Whistler, B.C., made Canada a player in the international sport community

Most Read