Power up with a power nap

The upsides and downsides when it comes to napping.

Of course babies, toddlers and the elderly need frequent naps to get through the day. But what about adults?

Who has time for a nap, anyway? While some cultures around the world view naps as an acceptable break in the day, others regard people who nap as lazy and unambitious.

So what’s the truth about naps? Do they help you power through a long day or slow you down and prevent sound night sleep?

The next time you have a few extra minutes on your hands, your eyes feel heavy and you’re wondering if you should take a nap, the following information may help you make your decision.

You stayed up late, the baby woke you up several times, or you just couldn’t sleep. It’s no wonder when the afternoon rolls around you feeling groggy, irritable and can’t concentrate. While a nap won’t make up for lost nighttime sleep, it can help you get through the day. Short naps have been shown to make you more alert, reduce accidents, improve performance and put you in a better mood.

They’re a simple way to relax and relieve tension when the day gets stressful. Similar to quiet time for an over-stimulated child, naps are like an adult time out.

Sound appealing? Naps can be beneficial when they’re the right length and at the right time of day. Naps that are too long, however, may hinder you from falling asleep at bedtime or cause sleep inertia. This means you slept long enough to fall into a deep sleep and wake still feeling sleepy, groggy and disoriented.

You’ll snap out of it within a half hour but sometimes you don’t have time to wait. Sleep deprived people experience the most grogginess after waking from a nap. If you already have trouble sleeping soundly through the night, it’s probably not a good idea to nap.

Naps can be a regular, habitual part of your day whether you feel sleepy or not, an emergency pick me up when you’re drowsy and need to accomplish something, or a planned time out when you know you have a long drive or a late night ahead.

The best time of day to nap is early afternoon, usually somewhere between 2 and 3 p.m. At this time of the day, you’ve recently had lunch, your blood sugar starts to fall and your energy begins to wane. Many people naturally feel sleepy at this time of day, possibly because their body clocks are programmed to sleep about seven hours after waking up. For most people, a brief nap at this time shouldn’t hinder you from falling asleep later that night.

To make it happen, find a comfortable and quiet place to rest. A darker environment is better, but you can wear a facemask if the room is too bright.

Keep your naps between 10 and 30 minutes. You may need to set an alarm to avoid sleeping longer or there’s a good chance you’ll wake feeling groggy.

Like the idea of naps but not sure they’re right for you? Try them out and see what time of day and length of nap work best for you.

Also, it’s a good idea to talk with your physician if you’re experiencing more daytime sleepiness than usual. Excessive sleepiness can be an indication of diabetes, depression, Parkinson’s disease, or a sleep disorder like apnea, narcolepsy, or restless leg syndrome.

Enjoy a regular afternoon nap? You’re not alone. Napoleon Bonaparte, Leonardo da Vinci, Winston Churchill, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, and John F. Kennedy were all nappers.

Jack Wheeler is a personal trainer and the owner of 360 Fitness in Red Deer.

Just Posted

Innisfail RCMP respond to home invasion

Male victim sustained non-life threatening head injury

Mountie seriously injured in early morning collision near Devon

An erratic driver is said to have collided with an RCMP cruiser

Vehicle thefts in Red Deer on the rise

Over 1,000 vehicles stolen in the span of a few months

WATCH: Red Deer 9-1-1 dispatcher thanked for birth assistance

Stearns family appreciative to Holly Shrader for helping deliver baby

Superintendent Ken Foster sees progress in city policing

Red Deer RCMP Superintendent has been on the job for a year and has seen success

WATCH: Red Deerians come together to ‘light the night’

Traditional Red Deer Lights the Night sees thousands

BC RCMP hunt for white SUV that rammed cruiser

Kamloops RCMP are looking for a white SUV headed north on the Yellowhead Highway

Canadian screen stars want ‘action’ from industry meeting on sexual misconduct

‘Of course there’s been sexual harassment here. Absolutely. No question.’

Opioid prescriptions up across Canada: report

The report shows the number of opioid prescriptions rose by almost seven per cent, while daily doses on average dropped

Russian meddling has implications for Canada

Kosovo president Hashim Thaci warns that Russian meddling has implications for Canada

Health Canada hints at government’s plans for legal pot

Health warnings, plain covers for pot packs under proposed regulations

Washington governor tells BC don’t be ‘daunted’ by Trump

“I want to assure this assembly that no matter who is in the White House, it won’t affect Washington state’s relationship with Canada or British Columbia.”

Feds plan to spend billions on housing strategy

However much of the $15.9 billion will not be spent until after the next election in 2019

David Cassidy, teen idol and ‘Partridge Family’ star, dies at 67

Cassidy announced earlier this year he had been diagnosed with dementia

Most Read