Man on trial for murder to learn fate today

  • Wed May 30th, 2012 3:13pm
  • News

The man who is charged in what police called a gang-style execution will learn his fate today.

Christopher Fleig, 28, is charged with first-degree murder in connection with the 2009 shooting death of Brandon Prevey, 29. He was also charged with conspiracy to commit murder against Nick Soto but that charge was dropped during the trial.

Prevey was shot and killed in what police say was a gang-style execution while sitting in his vehicle in the Inglewood area of Red Deer during the early morning hours of April 5, 2009. Fleig has denied he had any involvement in the murder and was in the area at the same time as the shooting to visit a friend a couple of blocks away.

Fleig’s trial began on April 30th in Red Deer.

Justice Kirk Sisson was expected to give his verdict of guilty or not guilty at 2 p.m. this afternoon in Red Deer’s Court of Queen’s Bench.

Last week as the trial wrapped up Crown Prosecutor Jason Snider and defense lawyer Allan Fay gave their closing arguments.

Fay told the court that there is no evidence directly linking Fleig to the murder.

“Mr. Fleig has steadfastly denied any involvement in the shooting. He knew who did it, how they did it and how they disposed of the weapon. There is not evidence before the court to prove beyond reasonable doubt that Mr. Fleig had anything to do with the murder of Mr. Prevey. No physical evidence was ever found in Mr. Fleig’s possession – no weapons, no walkie-talkies.”

He added two key witnesses that the crown called during the trial, Christopher Quinton and Ian Hunt gave their stories with the hopes of gaining personal advantage adding that both of their stories differ from when they were first interviewed by police and what they testified on the stand.

“Mr. Quinton never said Mr. Fleig produced a walkie-talkie in his statement to the police in August 2009. He also testified that while he was walking downtown to get his vehicle that he got a call from Mr. Fleig instructing him to come and dispose of the gun. In his statement to the police in August 2009 he never said that.”

He added Quinton became an informant for the police in an effort to avoid drug charges.

“Never once did it appear in Mr. Quinton’s career as a police informant he was able to get incriminating evidence against Mr. Fleig. Mr. Fleig never once said he had anything to do with the murder.”

Crown Prosecutor Jason Snider said neither witness had anything to gain from testifying.

“Both of them didn’t want to be involved. Mr. Quinton has no motive to accuse anyone. He does have a motive to cooperate with police however by not being charged (with drug charges),” he said.

Snider added there was evidence showing Fleig knew Prevey was going to be murdered.

“The evidence presented in this trial shows that a group got together to commit the shooting death of Brandon Prevey. The evidence shows that Mr. Fleig provided the firearm used, assisted in targeting the vehicle, verbally ordered the shooting and assisted in the disposal of the firearm.”

He added during Fleig’s time on the stand, his testimony was self serving and at times he was grasping at straws.

“The evidence is blatantly self serving. When asked a question that could be answered in a few words, he would go on for minutes. He was arrogant. He would point to how successful he was in the drug business and he tried to deflect questions.

“Mr. Fleig has said when he is acquitted of murder he wouldn’t go back to the drug world because he is a changed man, but later said he might go back to the drug world.”

Snider added Fleig’s credibility should also be taken into account.

“On multiple occasions he deflected questions or talked about how he is a changed man. He acted and considers himself above the law. Mr. Fleig talked about how he came about the information. He knew details without being involved and would just skirt under criminally.”

efawcett@reddeerexpress.com